Caleb Wilde

Caleb Wilde

(220 comments, 924 posts)

I'm a sixth generation funeral director. I have a grad degree in Missional Theology and a Certification in Thanatology.

And I like to read and write.

Connect with my writing and book plans by "liking" me on facebook. And keep tabs with my blog via subscription or twitter.

Posts by Caleb Wilde

If you have read my book, and you liked it, I’m kindly asking for some help

 

My book has been alive in the world for THREE WHOLE MONTHS!

Like a first time parent of a newborn child, I’ve been fraught with worry since it’s birth.  I check on it all too often to make sure it’s still breathing.  I’m constantly calling more experienced parents to ask all the questions:

Like the parents of a newborn, you might be tired of me posting photos of it ALL OVER THE INTERNET.  Facebook, Instagram, Twitter … everywhere you turn there I am, the proud parent, holding my book child up like it’s the first book to ever be written.

It’s not.  I know it’s not.  But, for me?  It’s my first.  And I am proud of it.

I know it won’t live forever, but I’ve got to help it as long as it is.  Most books don’t live but a couple years and then they die off into the nothingness of collecting dust on shelves around the world.  I know that the dying process usually starts soon after the book’s release, and I’m doing my best to keep this one living as long as I can.

In that light, I’m asking a favor from you:

If you read my book, and you liked it, I’m kindly asking you to help me as I try to raise it to be a contributing citizen of the world.

HERE ARE SOME PRACTICAL WAYS YOU CAN HELP:

ONE:  Word of mouth … that mystical, organic, grassroots foundation for the growth of any good product.  If you liked it, share it on Facebook, or Instagram, or with your check-out line neighbor at your local Wal-Mart.

TWO:  Introduce it to your group.  Small groups at church, book clubs, Facebook groups, your local brony chapter.  Groups are where books can take off.  A friend of mine had his book rocket to a best-seller list just because a youth organization decided to endorse it.  It’s the simple things that can go a long way.  And you, my friend, no matter how small, or how large your group, can help good things grow because you are powerful.

THREE: Buy one for a family member or friend who you think might benefit from it.

FOUR:  Leave a review!  On Amazon, Goodreads, on the bathroom stall at McDonald’s.  Positive, thoughtful reviews always help other potential buyers.  For me, every time I buy a new scalpel for the prep room, I always check the Amazon reviews.  Does it cut like promised?  Is it ergonomic?  Reviews help.

Thank you all!

 

 

 

Amazon is Discounting My Book (because apparently Black Friday is still a go at the Amazon HQ)

Amazon is discounting my book by two dollars, from $17.99 to the current price of $15.53. The discounted started on Black Friday and it’s still going as of Tuesday evening.  I’m just a very small pawn on Jeff Bezo’s chess board, so I have no control over when these discounts come and go.  If you were looking to buy a couple copies for a support group or for friends, or you were waiting for a cheap price (I’m frugal too), this is easily the cheapest option to date.

You can bounce over the book’s Amazon page by clicking HERE.

ALSO

I’m on Rob Bell’s podcast this week.  For those of you who don’t know Rob Bell, he used to have a show on Oprah’s network, and before he was working with Oprah, he was a rather progressive Pastor.  He’s easily one of my favorite speakers.  I actually flew out to his home studio in West Hollywood to do this interview.

If the Podcast plugin below doesn’t work for you, you can listen to our conversation HERE.


 

 

 

 

Endorsements from Death

 

 

 

If you haven’t already bought my book and you want to see what Death is raving about, click HERE to buy it on Amazon.

10 Horrible (and somewhat funny) Versions of Hell

Here’s the hustle of bad religion: The scarier religion makes death (and what comes after it), the more you buy into their message, and the more you’re obedient to their precepts.  So much of our death shaming comes from the temples, holy books, and firey teachers of religion that have to heighten your fear to garner your obedience.  Death, and what comes after it, has to be horrible to make it all work.  On the other hand, once you lose your fear of death (and fear of hell), bad religion loses its power over your mind, and you can gravitate towards healthy religion or none at all.

When the reality of hell comes to a head at funerals, I don’t think we actually think anyone goes to hell.  Sure, many religious people believe in hell, but few actually believe THEIR family and THEIR friends and THEIR community go there.  I write in my book, that of the thousands of funerals I’ve worked, “I have never once heard a pastor state conclusively that the person they are memorializing was going to hell … pastors have done some fancy preaching for those who have lived less than generous, kind, and loving lives.”  Hell may exist as an idea, but — for most — it doesn’t exist as a reality.

Maybe it’s time we jettison the idea too.  I mean, have you read some of the ideas of hell?  They’re so horrible it’s almost funny.  It’s like stuff made up to scare to children …

One.  In Dante’s Inferno (a great book that Disney should animate [fingers-crossed]), there are a whole lot of scare-the-disobedience-out-of-you descriptions of hell.  My personal favorite?  If you were a flatterer in life, you will live in a sea of poop when you die … which means that politicians (who are known to be full of crap) will go to a place as shitty as their promises.

Two.  Also of note in Dante’s Inferno: If you commit suicide, you’re turned into a living thorn bush that is constantly eaten by birds.  I have not idea if such a punishment is even painful (I mean, maybe I want to be eaten by birds if I’m full of thorns because at least I’m not entirely isolated by my thorniness), but I do know these special types of punishment for suicide helped create the shame culture surrounding suicide.  Let’s be clear: suicide (and suicidal attempts) does not deserve punishment from us, or the gods.

Three.  Chinese Taoism has a hell funhouse that consists of 19 levels with varying degrees of mutilation.  In one such level, you get thrown off a cliff where you’ll eventually land on a ground made of knives.  To review: if the impact from falling off a cliff doesn’t kill you, the knives will.

Four.  Taoism has another level where you’re continuously dismembered, and THEN crushed by giant rocks, and THEN fed through dismemberment machines, and THEN run over by chariots … just in case the dismemberment, rocks, and machines didn’t hurt enough.

Five. Niflheim in Norse mythology is probably the version that frightens me the most because instead of being hot, it’s VERY, VERY cold.  My greatest fear — aside from the existential void of meaninglessness  — is not having enough blankets on a cold night.  To make Niflheim even more frightening, they added a snake that goes around eating people.  Extreme cold.  Deadly snakes.  Yikes.

Six.  Now the Jewish “Gehenna” has some teeth to it.  “Gehenna” was a place outside of Jerusalem.  At one point in the history of Judaism, some Jewish kings decided to worship the god Moloch, who — didn’t demand wheat, goats, and money like the “nice” gods of the ancients — but babies.  They’d heat up a large skillet and threw their children into the skillet in sacrifice to Moloch.  When “Gehenna” was mentioned throughout the Bible, the image of hot skillets and burning children is the image that would be conjured in the minds of the Jews.

Seven.  Moving on from Gehenna, I present to you Diyu, the Chinese hell with 18 different levels, with each level having a different torture chamber, all of which sound like an S&M dungeon.  There’s the chamber of ripping, the chamber of knives, the chamber of ice, the chamber of pounding, and the chamber of uncomfortably tight latex.

Eight.  The Babylonians clearly didn’t understand the political value of hell.  In fact, it sounds like they were just a bunch of self-loathing Calvinists who believed that all of us deserve it.  Because, for the Babylonians, everyone — from the best to the worst — ended up going to the bad place.

Nine. Avici was hell for certain sects of Buddism.  It wasn’t eternal like some of the Christian versions, but it still lasted trillions of years.  But, unlike most other hells, YOU COULD ACTUALLY DIE IN AVICI.  Unfortunately, you’d be reborn in the same place only to suffer torment unto death all over again.  It’s basically Bill Murray’s Groundhog Day as a horror movie.

Ten.  One of the Hindu ideas of hell is called “Narak”, a place of 23 different levels of torture.  One such level consists of constant diarrhea.  I’ve been to Mexico.  I’ve had Montezuma’s Revenge, and it’s not all that horrible.  But have you ever had to do a number three and there was no toilet in sight?  That. Is. Living.  Hell.  And if that’s what Narak consists of, I’m truly frightened and I’ll be a good boy to avoid it.

I don’t believe that afterlife hell exists.  If you do believe in it, I hope you’ve grown out of it.  In other words, I hope that hell doesn’t have a hold on you because this is literally the control system of immature children, or disobedient dogs.  It’s the most base form of human motivation: fear.  And as long as we fear death, and what (doesn’t) come after it, we’ll never be able to enjoy life, nor will we ever be able to have a good relationship with death.

****

Some of this content comes from my book, “Confessions of a Funeral Director.”  Click the picture below to read more:

Flowers for Mom

By Karen Wyatt MD

The email arrived today, just as it always does, 5 days before my mother’s birthday: “It’s time to order flowers for Margaret!” The florist that sends this reminder has been in business in my hometown for over 100 years and has provided flowers for every birthday, wedding and funeral in my family for as long as I can remember.

I search through the available bouquets featured in the email: Sunny Siesta, Fields of Autumn, Country Sunrise, Butterfly Effect. I think Fields of Autumn is perfect, with orange lilies, green hydrangeas and yellow dahlias. Mom will love the colors and the wild, just-picked look of the arrangement.

But this year marks the fifth year that I won’t be sending mail order flowers to Mom; the fifth birthday when I won’t be calling her and hearing about her special celebrations with friends; the fifth year since her death, when I mark her birthday by lighting an orange candle in a private celebration of my own.

Each year when the email reminder arrives I feel a familiar twinge of pain and loneliness as I imagine how Mom’s face would light up when she opened the front door to receive the flowers I’ve chosen for her. I can see her placing the bouquet on her kitchen table, near the window where she always looked out to watch me play in the park across the street.

I wonder why the florist doesn’t know that Mom has died? They provided all of the flowers for her funeral, including the casket spray she had ordered and paid for several years before her death. I’m sure some people would be upset about the automated emails they send every September, but somehow I’ve grown to cherish them.

Choosing a special birthday bouquet for Mom is a long-held ritual for me and it’s one of the last connections I have to our relationship. There’s an indescribable emptiness that occurs with the death of the only person who loves every school photo of you, including the ones with missing teeth, pigtails, and geeky glasses; when the only person who would save your report cards and crayon drawings in the bottom of her lingerie drawer is gone; when you can never again feel the relief that comes from the sound of her voice calling you “honey” over the telephone.

Mom’s belongings, the special treasures that she had gathered over her lifetime, were sorted and scattered within a few months of her death. And her house, where I spent my childhood, has been remodeled by its new owners. The kitchen window no longer exists and the bedroom where she died is now unrecognizable. The cabin in the mountains where we used to camp and fish is now the playground of some other family. There is no longer a physical place that holds my memories.

But in my imagination Mom still opens the front door for the deliveryman and claps her hands with joy over the Fields of Autumn bouquet he holds out to her. She still clears a special spot on the table where the sunlight will show off the orange and yellow blossoms and arranges the attached card so that everyone can see who sent her birthday flowers. She still sits patiently in her reclining chair with the telephone in her lap, waiting for my birthday call. And I still whisper “I love you Mom,” as I celebrate the fact that she was born on September 23rd – born to live a life of love and to one day be my mother and raise me to be a mother as well.

So this year as I study the floral arrangements available to order and choose the perfect flowers for Mom, I have one lingering hope: that the florist keeps sending my reminder email every September. To them I say: thank you for still remembering my Mom’s special day, for helping me maintain my last remaining tribute to her and for the way my face lights up with joy each September 23rd when I see the orange and yellow colors of the Fields of Autumn bouquet.

 

About the Author:

 Dr. Karen Wyatt is a hospice and family physician who writes extensively on spirituality and medicine, especially at the end-of-life. She is the host of End-of-Life University Interview Series and author of “The Tao of Death” and the award-winning book “What Really Matters: 7 Lessons for Living from the Stories of the Dying” Connect with her at karenwyattmd.com, on Facebook at fb.com/KarenWyattMD and on Twitter @spiritualmd

 

 

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